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2018 Program
9th North American Materials Education Symposium


2018 Program

Symposium Day One: Thursday, August 16

time session
8.00 am Registration, coffee, and Poster setup
8.45 am Prof. Amit Misra, University of Michigan, USA
Welcome Address
8.50 am Prof. Steve Yalisove, University of Michigan, USA
Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK
Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
Introduction to the Symposium
  SESSION 1: PERSONALIZED LEARNING
9.00 am Session Chairs
Prof. Sunniva Collins, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Dr. Matthew Cavalli, Western Michigan University, USA
Session introduction
9.05 am Dr. Kelly Miller, Harvard, USA
How social reading platform improves pre-class reading compliance and student learning in college science classes
9.25 am Dr. Chris Timmis, Superintendent of Dexter Community Schools, USA
Personalized Learning: A Journey of Instructional Innovation and Lessons Learned
9.45 am Prof. Steve Yalisove, University of Michigan, USA
Prof. Marc DeGraef, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Prof. Kevin Jones, University of Florida, USA
Panel: An Open Source Introductory Materials Textbook for Our Community – A Discussion
10.05 am Poster Teaser Session
Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
25 x Poster Presenters invited to give a one-minute presentation
10.30 am One-hour Poster Session
Coffee
11.30 am Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK
Micro-projects to engage, educate and entertain
11.50 am Prof. Amy Moll, Boise State University, USA
Promoting Educational Reform through Institutional Transformation
12.10 pm Prof. David Williams, The Ohio State University, USA
Remote, Multi-student Teaching of Complex Scientific instrumentation
12.30 pm Morning discussion led by the session chair
12.55 pm Symposium photograph
1.00 pm Lunch
  SESSION 2: INNOVATION IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING TEACHING
2.00 pm Session Chairs
Prof. Amy Moll, Boise State University, USA
Dr. Ryan Brock, Stanford University, USA
Session Introduction
2.05 pm Prof. Bonnie J. Dunbar, Texas A&M University, USA
The 25 by 25 Initiative: Transforming Engineering Education at Texas A&M University
2.25 pm Prof. Tresa Pollock, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Graduate Education in Materials: The Impact of the Undergraduate
2.45 pm Prof. Perry Samson, University of Michigan, USA
How to Monitor In-Class Student Behaviors and Why You Should
3.05 pm Prof. Glenn Hibbard, University of Toronto, Canada
The Materials Paradigm as a Theory of Information
3.25 pm Poster Session continued
Coffee/Afternoon Tea
4.00 pm Prof. Mark Losego, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
The Materials Innovation & Learning Laboratory: A New Paradigm in Peer-to-Peer Experiential Learning
4.20 pm Prof. Rachel Goldman, University of Michigan, USA
Writing to Learn in Introductory Materials Science
4.40 pm Prof. John Nychka, University of Alberta, Canada
Using “Expectation Failures” to prompt “Failure Expectations”
5.00 pm Prof. Alan Taub, University of Michigan, USA
Integrating User-Centric Design in Multi-Disciplinary Experiential Learning
5.20 pm Afternoon discussion led by the session chairs
5.45 pm Symposium Award Ceremony
Prof. Steve Yalisove, University of Michigan, USA
Prof. Mike Ashby
, University of Cambridge, UK
5.50 pm Introduction to the next Symposia
Dr. Ryan Brock, Stanford University, USA
Mr. Marc Fry
, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
6.00 pm Close
6.45 pm Drinks reception
7.15 pm Sit-down Symposium Dinner

Symposium Day Two: Friday, August 17

time session
8.30 am Registration and coffee
  SESSION 3: INCREASING COMPUTATION IN THE CURRICULM
9.00 am Session Chairs
Prof. Rachel Goldman, University of Michigan, USA
Prof. Glenn Daehn,
The Ohio State University, USA
Session Introduction
9.05 am Prof. John Allison, University of Michigan, USA
Incorporating ICME into Engineering Curricula
9.25 am Prof. Katsuyo Thornton, University of Michigan, USA
Computational Materials Science and Engineering Education: Present and Future
9.45 am Dr. Josh Tappan, Citrine Informatics, USA
Teaching ML & AI in Materials through Experiential Learning
10.05 am Prof. Nik Nikolov, Lehigh University, USA
Concrete and Computation
10.25am Coffee
11.00 am Dr. Susan Gentry, University of California, Davis, USA
Developing Authentic Programming Assignments to Enhance Motivation
11.20 am Dr. Tanya Faltens, Purdue University, USA
Using Jupyter Notebooks to Access nanoHUB’s Materials Science Resources for Education and Research
11.40 am Dr. Jonathan Emery, Northwestern University, USA
Embedded and Interactive 3D Graphics for Materials Science
12.00 pm Prof. Steve Yalisove, University of Michigan, USA
Prof. Franc Nunoo Quarcoo, University of Michigan, USA
Drawing as a Practice: We Draw So We Can See
12.20 pm Morning discussion led by the session chairs
12.45 pm Lunch
  SESSION 4: DEVELOPING FUTURE MATERIALS SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS
1.45 pm Session Chairs
Prof. John Nychka, University of Alberta, Canada
Dr. Susan Gentry,
University of California, Davis, USA
Session Introduction
1.50 pm Prof. William Callister, University of Utah, USA
Incorporating the MSE Paradigm into Introductory Courses
2.10 pm Prof. Sunniva Collins, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Assessing Individual Performance in Team Based Projects
2.30 pm Prof. James Shackelford, University of California, Davis, USA
Teaching the Introductory Materials Course in Asia: Three Case
2.50 pm Dr. Ryan Brock, Stanford University, USA
Hands-on with Nanoindentation: An exploration of real-world mechanical properties
3.10 pm Coffee/Afternoon Tea
3.45 pm Dr. Ron Kander, Jefferson University, USA
The Material Science of Hemp
4.05 pm Prof. Glenn Daehn, The Ohio State University, USA
What Should a High School Materials Science Course Look Like?
4.25 pm Dr. Timothy Chambers, University of Michigan, USA
Meaningfully Engaging Large Student Groups in Advanced Materials Labs
4.45 pm Mr. Bill Mahoney, ASM International, USA
A Renewed Continuum of Materials Science Education Resources
5.05 pm Afternoon discussion led by the session chairs
5.30 pm Close and photograph
Prof. Steve Yalisove, University of Michigan, USA
Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK
Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK

Presentation Abstracts

How social reading platform improves pre-class reading compliance and student learning in college science classes

Dr. Kelly Miller, Harvard, USA

We illustrate the successful implementation of pre-class reading assignments through Perusall, a social learning platform that allows students to discuss the reading online with their classmates. Perusall encourages students to come to class prepared by facilitating social interactions around the course content and by automatically grading students’ work. We show how the platform can be used to understand how students are reading before class. We identify specific reading behaviors that are predictive of in-class exam performance. We also demonstrate ways that the platform promotes active reading strategies and produces high-quality learning interactions between students outside class. Finally, we compare the exam performance of two cohorts of students, where the only difference between them is the use of the platform; we show that students do significantly better on exams when using the platform.


Personalized Learning: A Journey of Instructional Innovation and Lessons Learned

Dr. Chris Timmis, Superintendent of Dexter Community Schools, USA

Christensen, Horn, and Staker (2013) defined "two basic types of innovation - sustaining and disruptive - that follow different trajectories and lead to different results." Sustaining innovations occur when existing organizations improve products or services in such as way as to better serve their best customers according to their initial definition of performance or "the way the market has historically defined what's good (Christensen, Horn, & Staker, 2013)." On the other hand, disruptive innovations generally serve an area of non-consumption by offering a new definition of what is good. "Over time, they improve enough to intersect with the needs of more demanding customers, thereby transforming a sector (Christensen, Horn, & Staker, 2013)." However, some industries "experience a hybrid stage when they are in the middle of a disruptive transformation (Christensen, Horn, & Staker, 2013)." In 2016, Dexter Community Schools (DCS) began a national personalized learning pilot known as Summit Basecamp. The experience thus far has been a "hybrid approach" where lessons have been learned while DCS works through a changing definition of "what is good" for our students and community. Innovation is not without immediate successes, immediate failures, and lessons learned. This presentation will describe the approach to personalized learning in a K-12 environment, including successes and lessons learned.

Keywords: Personalized learning, innovation, customized learning, project-based learning


An Open Source Introductory Materials Textbook for Our Community – A Discussion

Prof. Steve Yalisove, University of Michigan, USA; Prof. Marc DeGraef, Carnegie Mellon University, USA; and Prof. Kevin Jones, University of Florida, USA

The materials community is one of the few engineering disciplines that does not have an open source textbook available for students. Our efforts to increase the numbers of materials students may be suffering because we cannot access markets such as high schools, community colleges, or international students for economic reasons. This panel discussion is intended to highlight these issues and begin to develop a path to write an open source text by leveraging our professional and research societies as well as our materials education community.


Integrating User-Centric Design in Multi-Disciplinary Experiential Learning

Prof. Alan Taub, University of Michigan, USA

The highly competitive global marketplace necessitates companies to implement faster product development cycles with the resulting products tailored to consumer needs. This requires engineers to be comfortable working in multidisciplinary teams utilizing user-centric design methodologies. They must also be capable of handling system-level design and engineering complexities. The Senior Capstone Design Course offers an excellent opportunity to provide soon-to-be graduating engineers with this experience. For some students, this maybe their first action-based learning experience. For all, this is an opportunity to participate in a learning experience that is much closer to the way project work will be performed in various work sectors after graduation.

Over the past several years, we have transformed the Materials Science and Engineering capstone course to a multi-disciplinary class including Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The students from the departments are assigned to teams with each team having a unique sponsored project. They execute the project using a user-centric product design approach, with a disciplined product development process including formal design reviews and culminating in a working prototype by the end of the course. During the class we emphasize that the materials selection follows a coarse-to-fine development that parallels the product design from initial concept through final detailed design and fabrication. The composition of the teams leads to skill-practice in effective communication across multidisciplinary boundaries. For the materials engineering students, this is particularly important since materials are typically enablers rather than drivers of product design.


Promoting Educational Reform through Institutional Transformation

Prof. Amy Moll, Boise State University, USA

As a university, our primary mission is to educate our students. One of the essential elements of this education is what happens in the classroom. It is the instructor who controls that environment. In order to create engaged learning for students in materials science and engineering, all course work must be considered especially the foundational courses in science and math. At Boise State, with support from an NSF WIDER grant, we are in the midst of an institutional transformation to fundamentally change – across the entire STEM curriculum – what happens in the classroom. Through this project we are changing the experience of every STEM student in their foundational classes. And over time, we will change how every instructor at Boise State University teaches. These changes are centered on evidence-based instructional practices proven to be effective in increasing student learning in STEM courses and retaining students in a STEM major. In order to facilitate transformational change, a change model (Dormant’s CACAO Model) is used to propagate the use of evidence-based instructional practices.


Remote, Multi-student Teaching of Complex Scientific instrumentation

Prof. David Williams, The Ohio State University, USA

Materials characterization tools (e.g. AES, APFIM, SIMS, TEM and the rest of the acronym soup) evolve continually into ever-more complex instruments. The cost increases at a rate that outpaces the ability of departments and colleges to manage. This imbalance is exacerbated because it is usually possible to teach only one student at a time on the instrument. Teaching time reduces research access thus diminishing income to the facility, causing heartache to deans and their senior fiscal officers. One approach to mitigate this is to use technology to provide remote, parallel teaching to multiple students on a single instrument. While remote access for TEMs has been around for ~ 25 years, its application to multi-student teaching has been slower to develop. At the Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis at OSU, we have implemented this approach and can engage ~ 30 students simultaneously in learning to operate expensive aberration-corrected analytical TEMs.


The 25 by 25 Initiative: Transforming Engineering Education at Texas A&M University

Prof. Bonnie J. Dunbar, Texas A&M University, USA

The 25 by 25 initiative is a transformational education program designed to increase access for qualified students to pursue engineering education at Texas A&M University and to grow total enrollment to 25,000 students by 2025. This includes students on the TAMU College Station, Galveston, Qatar and McAllen campuses, online master's degree students and students in our statewide engineering academies. The 25 by 25 initiative is not just about increasing numbers. It is also about enhancing quality and excellence. Integral to the program, effective fall semester, 2018, undergraduate students will have access to a new state of the art engineering engagement center on the College Station campus, with new technology, laboratories, and interactive classrooms. The Zachry Engineering Education Center represents a leap forward in engineering education. It will be the largest academic building on campus and unlike any other facility in the nation. The 525,000-square-foot complex includes a state-of-the-art Engineering Design Center, revolutionizing the way we deliver education to our undergraduate students. It will be a departure from the traditional classroom and lecture hall, focusing on student-centered design to optimize modern learning techniques and technology. Included in the design are active learning studios, interdisciplinary laboratories with state-of-the-art machine shops, including 3D printers, a student career center, multi-level tutoring and advising center, informal meeting and study areas, offices for all first-year faculty, K-12 outreach offices, study abroad offices, offices for engineering student organizations, and the Institute for Engineering Education and Innovation (IEEI).


Graduate Education in Materials: The Impact of the Undergraduate

Prof. Tresa Pollock, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Materials science is becoming an increasingly interdisciplinary academic enterprise, particularly at the graduate education level. At the graduate level in the US, incoming students have a diverse array of undergraduate degrees, across engineering, physics and chemistry. Challenges in graduate materials education will be discussed, including the core graduate curriculum, the broad participation of faculty, research, instrumentation and computation. Driving forces for change in the graduate curriculum will be discussed, including the role of integrated computational materials science and engineering, big data and diversity of graduate materials students.


How to Monitor In-Class Student Behaviors and Why You Should

Prof. Perry Samson, University of Michigan, USA

It is both sobering and useful to know what students are doing during class and how their behaviors are related to grades. This talk describes how data collected from Canvas, Echo360 and surveys are combined and mined in real-time to produce evidence-based feedback to students on how their behaviors are related to exam grades.


The Materials Paradigm as a Theory of Information

Prof. Glenn Hibbard, University of Toronto, Canada

Cyril Stanley Smith wrote the opening article of a special 1967 edition of Scientific American that was dedicated to the then emerging field of Materials Science and Engineering [1]. Smith took a sweeping approach to his article, writing: “Now that the ultimate structure and gross properties can be related fundamentally, it is seen that there is less difference between different kinds of materials than had been supposed when they were the basis of totally separate crafts and industries.” Smith focused on what he felt was the key contribution to come from this new field: “The most useful properties are the structure-sensitive ones with which the classical physicist was utterly incapable of dealing and therefore did not consider to be physics.” and he finished his article by speculating that ‘the habits of thought’ coming from this new materials paradigm might prove to be more important than the actual materials themselves. Some 50 years later we can now see what these habits of thought might entail. It was Claude Shannon who gave us a means of quantifying information [2], but it is the materials paradigm, which tells us how to solve the semantic information problem, i.e. how does one bridge information of one kind to another in order to generate meaning? In this talk we will argue that the materials paradigm represents our first materials-based theory of information, that the paradigm is a powerful ontology, and we look at what opportunities such framing might hold for the discipline going forward, in particular the implications on teaching practices and modes.

References: [1] C.S. Smith, Scientific American, Vol. 217, No. 3 (September 1967), pp. 68-79 [2] C. E. Shannon, W. Weaver. The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Univ of Illinois Press, 1949


The Materials Innovation & Learning Laboratory: A New Paradigm in Peer-to-Peer Experiential Learning

Prof. Mark Losego, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Over the past three years, a new open-access lab has been created within the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech: The Materials Innovation and Learning Laboratory (The MILL). Unlike other open-access “maker-spaces” that are emerging at universities, high schools, and even grade schools across the world, The MILL is a bit different because it focuses on both “making” and “measuring” – the latter of which being a core principle of the Materials Science discipline. This unique “make-and-measure” space is open-access to everyone on campus and run exclusively by a team of 50 undergraduate volunteers that staff about 1500 sq. ft. of lab space for 35 hrs / week that includes over $500,000 in materials processing, characterization, and measurement equipment common to the discipline (SEM/EDX, FTIR, XRD, XRF, mechanical testing, UV/Vis spectrophotometer, mills, presses, furnaces, etc). While funding is one challenge, equally difficult is creating a successful culture with respect to safety, technical depth, and sustained student engagement.

This presentation will discuss the development of this space, the core tenants to choosing equipment (sacrificing performance for ease of use), and how to build a student culture that thrives in this space. Like any peer-to-peer learning environment, scaffolding is essential to success. We quickly learned that the average undergraduate student was excited to “learn the equipment” but then did not know “what to do with it”. We attribute this to the increased technical depth necessary in identifying scientific problems versus design challenges. In response, we have created Learning and Discovery teams that are student-led “research” efforts within a “designated”, but expansive, scientific/engineering/creative space. This presentation will share lessons learned as well as ideas for other universities to team with existing maker-spaces on campus to add a “measurement” component that engages students with and educates students about materials science.

Keywords: Experiential Learning, peer-to-peer education, maker-space, scaffolding


Writing to Learn in Introductory Materials Science

Prof. Rachel Goldman, University of Michigan, USA

M-Write is a campus-wide project which aims to transform teaching and learning in gateway courses through enhanced student engagement and transformative learning. In Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), we are implementing Writing to Learn (WTL) assignments and peer review in courses spanning from introductory undergraduate to advanced graduate levels. The WTL assignments enable students to apply content knowledge to "real-world" situations via writing, which promotes deeper thinking and compels students to explain concepts in their own words. The subsequent peer review and revision processes provide additional learning opportunities as the students give and receive feedback on content and critically self-assess their own work. In this project, we are quantifying the influence of WTL assignments on student understanding of key concepts in introductory MSE courses. The project involves evaluated the effectiveness of the WTL assignments and their impact on student learning. Both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are utilized, including pre/post assessment surveys and interviews, as well as analysis of writing products.

In this presentation, we will discuss our use of Writing to Learn in Introductory MSE. For example, we have used WTL to assist student learning of polymer properties, with a prompt that focuses on polymer recycling and its impact on mechanical properties. Our research suggests that the polymer recycling WTL assignment was effective in promoting understanding of stress-strain behavior of polymers, but that further support is needed to help students connect polymer microscopic properties to macroscopic behavior [1]. The effectiveness of WTL assignments associated with other key concepts including the atomic packing in crystals, ductile vs. brittle failure, interpretation of phase diagrams, and corrosion as it relates to the Flint water crisis will also be discussed.

[1]S.A. Finkenstaedt-Quinn, A.S. Halim, T.G. Chambers, A. Moon, R.S. Goldman, A.R. Gere, G.V. Shultz, J. Chem. Educ.94, 1610 (2017)


Using “Expectation Failures” to prompt “Failure Expectations”

Prof. John Nychka, University of Alberta, Canada

Mental models (schemata) are some of the strongest builders of, and barriers to, our learning–our schemata shape and bias our ability to learn because they are “…knowledge structures that represent objects or events and provide default assumptions about their characteristics, relationships, and entailments under conditions of incomplete information.” (DiMaggio, 1997; p.269). Because schemata are models of reality they are often incorrect in construction or in application to certain learning situations–our default thinking settings do not always work, and when they don’t a cognitive dissonance develops. To achieve deep learning, we can intellectually challenge our learners (Bain, 2004) by creating an “expectation failure” which is: “a situation in which existing mental models will lead to faulty expectations, causing [students] to realize the problems they face in believing whatever they believe.” (Bain, 2004; p.28). “Expectation failures” motivate a learner to adjust their schema by memorably exposing a knowledge gap and stimulating meta-cognition.

This presentation highlights case studies in which “expectation failures” were designed into a low-stakes materials failure analysis. Through Socratic questioning, learners came to realize their errors of impression, assumptions, hasty generalizations, unfounded conclusions, and misinterpretations. A post-inspection discussion prompted reflection and identification of the causes of the “expectation failures” and revealed the benefits of a shift to “failure expectation” mentality, wherein the learner embraces that their current schema might be flawed and a possible hindrance to a growth mentality. The shift to “failure expectation” can lower the risk of cognitive dissonance when encountering an “expectation failure”, whilst also lowering the barrier for schemata adjustments. By embracing and expecting failure as a deep learning activity learners can be more comfortable in making mistakes, and become more flexible, and meta-cognitive, in adjusting their schemata.

References: Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2004. DiMaggio, P. (1997). Culture and Cognition. Annual Review Of Sociology, 263.

Keywords: Constructivism, expectation failure, failure expectation, case-based learning, experiential learning


Micro-projects to engage, educate and entertain

Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK

A Micro-project is a short, progressive investigation of an aspect of Materials Science and Engineering (MS&E) that can be completed, in short form, in less than an hour. It is structured to give positive reinforcement, develop facility with Materials soft-ware tools and to encourage problem-solving skills. The premise is that learning by discovery is more effective that learning by listening, and that an engaging project can provoke the sense of “want to know” that is the catalyst of learning. Offering a range of micro-projects allows student choice and voice and provides an element of personalized learning.

The sets of micro-projects described here are designed work with the CES EduPack, though they can be used without it. All start at a level that is readily accessible, using the SEARCH function to find information about materials, processes and products, creating charts using the CHART/SELECT function, and extracting relevant data from Records and their linked SCIENCE NOTES. The aim is to capture the students’ interest by posing a striking or contemporary question, provide a step-wise path to a sometimes-unexpected answer, and give the satisfaction of having found it themselves.

Each Micro-project has an attached Discussion Point – a challenge to go further. The Discussion Point poses a question linked to or arising from the first part of the micro-project, so each project has two parts. The first part is the lead-in; its quick, it has clear learning goals and is within the scope of a Freshman. Responding to the Discussion point requires independent thought and research, takes longer, but is rewarding if followed. The target level here are Junior and Senior classes.

Each Micro-project and its Discussion point has a fully worked Specimen Response, available to the instructor. Fifteen micro-projects exploring aspects of Materials Science and ten exploring Materials aspects of Sustainability are currently available on the Granta Design Education Hub. More are under development.


Incorporating ICME into Engineering Curricula

Prof. John Allison, University of Michigan, USA

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) links materials information in the form of computational models with simulation of manufacturing processing and product performance. In 2008, the influential National Academies report on ICME* suggested that it is a transformational discipline for accelerating the development of new materials, processes and engineering components. Incorporation of ICME and computational methods into engineering curricula is an important enabler for achieving the transformational benefits envisioned by this study. This talk will review the author's experiences in this endeavor as well as future challenges and opportunities.

*"Integrated Computational Materials Engineering: A Transformational Discipline for Improved Competitiveness and National Security", The National Academies Press, 2008.


Computational Materials Science and Engineering Education: Present and Future

Prof. Katsuyo Thornton, University of Michigan, USA

Computational MSE has become a recognized subdiscipline of Materials Science & Engineering. In addition to academic research, industry routinely utilizes computational tools today, giving impetus to provide education and training to the future workforce. In this talk, we first review the state of computational materials science and engineering (CMSE) education based on a recent survey that appeared in JOM (DOI:10.1007/s11837-018-2989-7), followed by a discussion of a few models for incorporating computation into undergraduate MSE courses in addition to traditional stand-alone CMSE courses. One is based on laboratory courses, with examples of topics that can be covered. Another is based on required courses, with examples of one- or two-week-long modules in regular courses. Their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, as well as practical implementation approaches at different levels. Finally, we will describe the Summer School for Integrated Computational Education that facilitates the implementation of computational modules within existing required MSE curriculum.


Teaching ML & AI in Materials through Experiential Learning

Dr. Josh Tappan, Citrine Informatics, USA

Dr. Josh Tappan, Citrine Informatics’ community manager, will share their approach to materials informatics education initiatives. Citrine has successfully run several hands on, experiential programs with universities across the country. Josh will discuss Citrine’s NextGen fellowship, which sponsored 30+ undergraduate fellows in materials informatics research projects across the United States, as well as the Mines Initiative for Data Driven Materials Innovation (MIDDMI), a partnership with the Colorado School of Mines, which helped eight student groups incorporate machine learning and materials informatics techniques into their research. Attendees will be able to access some of the open educational resources Citrine developed as part of these programs.


Concrete and Computation

Prof. Nik Nikolov, Lehigh University, USA

New materials require new design and construction methods. Even old materials are being continually developed with new properties that challenge the way we use them. A recent cycle of innovations has led to concretes with considerable and effective elastic limit in tension and flexural strength. The possibility to design in concrete as a single orthotropic material with both tensile and compressive properties create an opportunity for new products but also require new design approaches. Topology optimization as an architectural design tool is largely unexplored, in contrast to its wide use in the field of mechanical engineering. Topologically optimized shapes are fundamentally different from standard structural shapes and require highly customized means of fabrication. The resulting members can be lighter, use less material, yet still be as strong. Perhaps of greatest importance is the observation that the topologically optimized shape simultaneously manifests a structural optimum and an emergent aesthetic.

This presentation will introduce the basics of structural topology optimization, existing software, and show how it was used in architectural technology coursework. The assignment in view, given to intermediate architectural students, is to design and optimize a structural beam and to subsequently fabricate it in ultra-high performance concrete using consumer level CNC-milling of polystyrene casting formwork. Computer stress simulations were compared to physical crush tests. An increasing number of architects and engineers are well-versed in emerging digital fabrication and computation technologies. The presentation will posit that the materials with emerging properties and accessible computation tools provide a platform for both architects and engineers to engage in the problem of combining structural efficiency and aesthetic.

Keywords: concrete, computation, topology optimization, UHPC, fabrication, beam design


Developing Authentic Programming Assignments to Enhance Motivation

Dr. Susan Gentry, University of California, Davis, USA

Programming and computational tools are commonly taught in a materials science curriculum, with student performance varying due to their prior knowledge and motivation. Students' knowledge can be addressed through scaffolding (as discussed at the 2017 NAMES conference), while their motivation has recently been addressed through creating authentic assignments. In an upper-division kinetics course, students complete a set of MATLAB assignments. The first two modules are skill-based, requiring students to demonstrate their knowledge of programming syntax and computational methods. Students then complete a series of technical memos, such as predicting reaction kinetics, simulating diffusion couples, and analyzing three-dimensional microstructures. For each technical assignment, students are given a workplace scenario which requires the use of MATLAB and materials science knowledge to solve the problem. These activities seek to enhance students' learning through increased motivation and utilize methods described in the book How Learning Works by Susan A. Ambrose et al. Motivation can be divided into several subcategories such as students' efficacy expectations ("Can I succeed?") and value ("Will this help me get a job after I graduate?"). When designing a computational module, an instructor can activate multiple aspects of motivation from expectancy-value theory. Effective course design will stimulate students' motivation of programming topics, supporting the learning of all students (not just the best students).


Using Jupyter Notebooks to Access nanoHUB’s Materials Science Resources for Education and Research

Dr. Tanya Faltens, Purdue University, USA

Jupyter Notebooks run within nanoHUB provide a new way to interact with the materials science simulation and visualization tools available there. Jupyter Notebooks combine text editing, live code and powerful visualization tools. These notebooks can be used to create interactive tutorials where the learner can read text, look at images, watch videos, and study equations, then run software interactively, modify it or launch more sophisticated nanoHUB simulations. The interactive nature of Jupyter notebooks allows small blocks of code within the tutorial to be independently re-run with new values, so that students can interrogate concepts and investigate trends. The building-block structure of the notebooks provides a natural scaffolding that can be used to introduce students to some basic computer coding in order to make interactive calculators for some of the materials science equations commonly employed with topics such as crystal structures, x-ray diffraction and diffusion. The versatility of these notebooks has allowed them to be used in a number of courses at Purdue University, from introductory-level courses that focus on materials science concepts (as opposed to coding), to more advanced courses that train students in numerical computation methods that are used in simulations. This talk will present and discuss several of these tutorials and provide the audience members with example Jupyter notebooks that they can access and run from a web browser on their laptop or smartphone. nanoHUB.org is an open-access cyberinfrastructure supported by the National Science Foundation, and is a versatile platform for delivering computational resources to enable materials science simulations for research and education. On the back end, nanoHUB resources include high performance computing clusters that enable research-quality simulation. nanoHUB enables free cloud scientific computing worldwide, allowing users to access simulation tools via a web-browser without the need to install software or have access to local computing resources.


Embedded and Interactive 3D Graphics for Materials Science

Dr. Jonathan Emery, Northwestern University, USA

A critical skill for the materials scientist or engineer is the ability to mentally visualize and manipulate 3D objects such as crystal structures, higher-order phase diagrams, or tensor fields. It is a struggle for many students, however, interpret static 2D representations of data that is inherently three-dimensional. Studies on student learning1 find that access to interactive 3D rendering yield positive learning outcomes for most students regardless of their spatial abilities. In Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) there have been numerous approaches in communicating 3D information to students, but the majority of MSE course materials relay static and two-dimensional graphics. Here, we present the development of 3D content (crystal structures and phase diagrams) directly and unobtrusively embedded into PDF course documentation for streamlined presentation and interactive assignments. Compared to supplemental software approaches (CrystalMaker, Vesta, Paraview, etc.), this approach lowers barriers for students to access rich media. Further, this approach allows dual-modality delivery (allowing students to manipulate 3D models on their computers during in-class lecture) and enables direct embed of rich media into assessments such as homework assignments or quizzes. At Northwestern we’ve implemented these embedded, interactive 3D in introductory courses as well as courses in crystallography and phase equilibria. MSE-specific learning studies are underway to assess the efficacy of this approach. Future developments will include deployable model libraries, push-button interactivity, gamification, and student activity recorders. 1Höffler, T.N. Educ Psychol Rev (2010) 22: 245. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10648-010-9126-7

Keywords: Rich media


Drawing as a Practice: We Draw So We Can See

Prof. Steve Yalisove and Prof. Franc Nunoo Quarcoo, University of Michigan, USA

Traditional engineering education curricula used to include at least one course on engineering graphics. Drafting was taught in high school and every engineer was skilled at using French curves and getting India ink out of their clothing. Now this part of the engineering curriculum is almost extinct. Does this matter? We believe that it has significantly limited the ability of our engineering students to design 3-D objects, communicate to each other and to society. This talk will present our (very low tech) efforts to -simply- bring drawing back into the curriculum, vastly improve 3-D visualization, understand the vocabulary of visual design, and communicate what we do as engineers to the general public by simple sketches, graphical design, and whiteboard video. Central to our efforts is a collaboration between the Stamps School of Art and Design and the College of Engineering via dialogue and a co-taught usual communications course.


Incorporating the MSE Paradigm into Introductory Courses

Prof. William Callister, University of Utah, USA

One of the motivational deterrents in many engineering courses is the inability of students to perceive a sense of relevance regarding principles they are expected to learn and understand—especially abstract principles such as those associated with materials science (e.g., atomic bonding, dislocations, phase diagrams). I propose that incorporating elements of the materials science and engineering paradigm (the processing, structure, properties, performance business) into an introductory materials course can increase the motivational incentive for students by providing relevance in an incremental manner. Furthermore, using this approach, students can come to understand the important interrelationships among the processing, structure, properties and performance of materials. Specific examples for several materials will be provided, as well as suggestions on how to incorporate this approach in the classroom (tradition and “flipped”). (This concept and these examples appeared in the 9th edition of my Materials Science and Engineering—An Introduction textbook.)


Assessing Individual Performance in Team Based Projects

Prof. Sunniva Collins, Case Western Reserve University, USA

Project-based learning is an important strategy in personalized learning. A well-designed project gives students the freedom to explore topics they find interesting. The use of the semester-long team-based project is a standard approach to teaching design in the engineering curriculum. A common complaint from students concerning team-based projects is that some team members are "sliding and hiding", leaving other team members with most of the work. Skill sets among team members can be mismatched, as some students are more mature or more technically adept than others. A poor team project experience can leave students concerned about fairness of assessments. With modifications to team formation and instruction early in the course on team behavior and dynamics, more successful outcomes can be achieved in the project experience. At Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH), the capstone course in the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum, Design for Manufacturing II, provides opportunities for project-based learning. The scope of the project and the size of the team allows students to develop areas of expertise based on their interests. This presentation will discuss data and observations from the last several offerings of the courses, and methods for fair assessment of student learning, personal development, and contributions to the team.

Keywords: Project-based learning, individual assessment


Teaching the Introductory Materials Course in Asia: Three Case

Prof. James Shackelford, University of California, Davis, USA

Case Study No. 1 – South Korea 2011 In the UC Davis Summer Abroad Program, the introductory materials course (Engineering 45) was offered during the summer of 2011 at Yeungnam University. While compressing the 10-week course into one month was a challenge, the cultural and personal benefits of having an even mix of 10 US and 10 Korean students were major advantages. Case Study No. 2 – Vietnam 2011 and 2013 As part of an ongoing interaction between UC Davis and the Hanoi University of Mining and Geology (HUMG), [1] the E45 course was offered for the first time in Fall 2011 and again in 2013. The overall purpose of the interaction is to help HUMG modernize its chemical engineering curriculum. The entire 30 hours of lecture covered in a 10-week quarter at UC Davis is compressed into two weeks. This compressed course provided the concept for developing the MOOC, Materials Science: Ten Things Every Engineer Should Know. Case Study No 3 – China 2016 to the present: I was invited to begin lecturing in the introductory course in the International School of Materials Science and Engineering at the Wuhan University of Technology (WUT) in Spring 2016. Their introductory course has many more lecture hours in a semester offering (70 hours versus 30 hours for E45 at UCD). By visiting WUT for two weeks at a time to guest lecture in the regular course offering, I will have covered the entire 70 hours of lecture material by Fall 2019. A special benefit of this interaction is the opportunity to view the rapidly advancing developments in materials research and teaching in China first hand. [1] C.Q. Choi, “Hearts and Minds,” ASEE Prism, January 2018, pp. 32-35.

Keywords: Introductory, materials, Korea, Vietnam, China


Hands-on with Nanoindentation: An exploration of real-world mechanical properties

Dr. Ryan Brock, Stanford University, USA

Often in laboratory courses, and particularly those focusing on mechanical properties, choosing materials which are relevant and interesting to students can be challenging. So why not solve that challenge by putting sample choice in the hands of the students? This talk presents and discusses the results of a newly-developed module in Stanford’s Mechanical Behavior Laboratory course, in which students are given free rein (within reasonable limits) to bring in ‘real-world’ materials to explore their mechanical properties. Compared against a previous version of the module which focused on nanoindentation of single-crystal materials, we note both a marked increase in both depth of understanding as well as in overall enthusiasm of students’ in-class presentations. Additionally, this module is discussed within the broader context of the course, which includes a focus on building technical communication skills.


The Material Science of Hemp

Dr. Ron Kander, Jefferson University, USA

The Challenge: Throughout history, hemp has been recognized as a sustainable, renewable resource with a host of industrial applications. An interdisciplinary team of Jefferson students and faculty from design, engineering, science, and business disciplines were challenged to explore new materials and products that can be realized from a modern US industrial hemp industry. The challenge includes developing a basic scientific understanding of hemp and hemp derived materials, developing new product concepts, and defining the markets and supply chains required to realize sustainable industrial hemp business models.

The Process: The team is developing a basic understanding of hemp as an industrial raw material. They are developing novel ways to process hemp into new material forms and combine hemp with other materials to make composite structures with unique properties. The team is also working collaboratively with industry partners to identify performance advantages, cost advantages, sustainability advantages, and branding/marketing advantages of the hemp-based materials. These advantages can then be leveraged by the industrial hemp industry in the development of high-value products.

The Solution: Currently, hemp is underutilized as a raw material in the United States due to more than 50 years of laws and policies prohibiting, or severely limiting, its use. As these policies change, the use of hemp as an industrial raw material will grow in the US due to a renewed interest in the sustainable manufacturing of consumer products using renewable resources. The results of this work will support the growing US industrial hemp industry by developing new material forms, imagining new product concepts, identifying new markets, and articulating marketing/ branding strategies.

Keywords: Hemp. Undergraduate Research, Active Learning, Student Engagement


What Should a High School Materials Science Course Look Like?

Prof. Glenn Daehn, The Ohio State University, ASM Materials Education Foundation, and LIFT, USA

Many high schools now teach materials science as a full course, to rave reviews from teachers and students alike. The offering varies greatly place to place, but is usually based on the content provided at the ASM Materials Camps for Teachers, which in turn was adapted from content developed about 30 years ago at Pacific Northwest National Lab. Much anecdotal evidence shows that the course is successful because it treats real needs – those of showing how the disparate S, T, E and M disciplines fit together and providing authentic opportunities for students to develop hands-on skills in an open-ended environment. This talk will ruminate on what the appropriate topics should be for high a school materials science curriculum and discuss strategies for standardizing, improving and spreading these courses.


Meaningfully Engaging Large Student Groups in Advanced Materials Labs

Dr. Timothy Chambers, University of Michigan, USA

Advanced laboratory courses in materials science pose unique challenges to instructors. One such challenge is keeping large groups of students engaged when equipment availability is limited. However, evidence-based pedagogical techniques informed by STEM education research give us ways to overcome these challenges. This talk presents methods we have successfully applied in our upper-division labs to keep students not merely busy, but actively engaged in cognitively rich and meaningful investigations, despite equipment limitations. A central component of these methods is the use of both individual and team-based computational and writing activities that explicitly interconnect theory and experiment and give students options to pursue their own interests within the context of the lab class. Our work in this area also addresses broader issues of interest to the community such as integrating computation into the curriculum and providing opportunities for individualized instruction.


A Renewed Continuum of Materials Science Education Resources

Mr. Bill Mahoney, ASM International, USA

ASM International and its supporting organization, the ASM Materials Education Foundation, are renewing its continuum of educational resources available for materials science, engineering, and technical students and professionals. The presentation will explain how ASM is renewing its approach to developing, positioning and deploying educational content for a continuum of students, ranging from middle school and extending through adult professional development. The presentation will also detail how ASM and its Foundation are changing their content and delivery to sustain and grow a $4m annual business, as well as to address the current shortage of degreed materials science graduates, entering incorporate, government, and academic market segments.