Materials Education Symposia - Home

2018 Program
3rd Asian Materials Education Symposium

Talks and poster sessions allow educators to share ideas and resources for materials-related teaching. There is no restriction based on particular approaches or the use of any particular resources. Speakers and poster presenters will be invited to join the presenters' dinner (free of charge and exclusively for presenters and session chairs).

Symposium Day One: Thursday, December 13

time session
8.00 am Registration, Coffee, and Poster setup
9.00 am Prof. Seh Chun Lim, Singapore University of Technology and Design
Welcome Address
9.10 am Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, United Kingdom
Introduction to the Symposium
  SESSION 1: EDUCATING THE NEXT GENERATION OF MATERIALS DESIGNERS AND ENGINEERS
9.20 am Session Chair
Prof. John Wang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Session Introduction
9.25 am Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK
Micro-projects to engage, educate and entertain
9.45 am Prof. Shenmin Zhu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P. R. China
Educating Next Generation of Materials Engineers with Global Vision: Experimental Efforts Made in Shanghai
10.05 am Poster Teaser Session
Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, United Kingdom
Poster Presenters invited to give a one-minute presentation about their poster
10.30 am One-hour Poster Session & Coffee
11.30 am Prof. Hanxing Liu, Wuhan University of Technology, P. R. China
International Collaborative Cultivation of Top-notch Innovation Talents in Materials Science
and Engineering
11.50 pm Prof. Daniel Blackwood, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Engineering Principles and Practice (EPP) – Workshop-based Modules
12.10 pm Morning discussion led by the session chair
12.30 pm Lunch
  SESSION 2: EDUCATING THE NEXT GENERATION OF MATERIALS DESIGNERS AND ENGINEERS
1.30 pm Session Chair
Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
Session Introduction
1.35 pm Prof. Anthony Cheetham, University of Cambridge, UK
International Aspects of Materials Education
1.55 pm Prof. Guang-chao Chen, University Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, P. R. China
Teaching methodology of MSE in UCAS
2.15 pm Dr. Liwen Lei, Wuhan University of Technology, P. R. China
Multidimensional education of Materials Science and Engineering course
2.35 pm Poster Session continued
Coffee/Afternoon Tea
3.30 pm Prof. Jianguo Guan, Wuhan University of Technology, P. R. China
International Collaborative Cultivation of Top-notch Innovation Talents in MSE
3.50 pm Prof. Lanting Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P. R. China
Development of undergraduate level computational materials science curriculum at Shanghai Jiao Tong
4.10 pm Afternoon discussion led by the session chairs
4.30 pm Symposium Award Ceremony
Prof. Seh Chun Lim, Singapore University of Technology and Design
Prof. Mike Ashby
, University of Cambridge, UK
4.45 pm Introduction to the next Symposia
Mr. Marc Fry
, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
5.00pm Close and Symposium photograph
5.10 pm Tour of SUTD teaching facilities
Evening SYMPOSIUM DINNER


Symposium Day Two: Friday, December 14

time session
8.30 am Registration and coffee
9.00 am Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK
Introduction to the Symposium
  SESSION 3: BUILDING A BETTER WORLD THROUGH TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN
9.10 am Session Chair
Dr. Adrian Lowe
, Australian National University, Australia
Session Introduction
9.15 am Prof. Lucienne Blessing, Singapore University of Technology and Design
The new design freedom: matter matters
9.35 am Prof. Bige Tuncer, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 
Materials and Architecture  
9.55 am Dr. Koichi Ohtomi, Meiji University, Japan
Design education program in corporation with Ashby method and 1DCAE
10.15 am Coffee
11.00 am Dr. Gabriel Cavalli, Queen Mary University of London, UK
Transnational Education: The value of equal partnerships
11.20 am Dr. Arlindo Silva, Singapore University of Technology and Design
Introduction to Design: SUTD’s freshmore innovative approach
11.40 am Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
Inspiring students with Products, Materials and Processes
12.00 pm Morning discussion led by the session chairs
12.30 pm Lunch
  SESSION 4: BUILDING A BETTER WORLD THROUGH TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN
1.30 pm Session Chair
Prof. Lucienne Blessing
, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore
Session Introduction
1.35 pm Dr. Adrian Lowe, Australian National University, Australia
Educating the Thought Leaders of the Future
1.55 pm Dr. Jeongbin Ok, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Material-focused Design Education Towards Sustainability
2.15 pm Dr. Amit Singh, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, India
Sustainability Through Right Material Selection Choice and Well studied Design
2.35 pm Dr. Jiao Mo, Tongji University, P. R. China
Design Driven Craft Studies
2.55 pm Afternoon discussion led by the session chairs
3.15 pm Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK
Prof. Seh Chun Lim, Singapore University of Technology and Design
Closing remarks
3.30 pm Close of event and Coffee


Presentation Abstracts

Micro-projects to engage, educate and entertain

Prof. Mike Ashby, University of Cambridge, UK

A Micro-project is a short, progressive investigations of an aspect of Materials Science and Engineering (MS&E) that can be completed, in short form, in less than an hour. It is structured to give positive reinforcement, develop facility with Materials soft-ware tools and encouraging problem-solving skills. Micro-projects are aimed at students of MS&E at the undergraduate level. The premise is that learning by discovery is more effective that learning by listening, and that an engaging project can provoke the sense of “want to know” that is the catalyst of learning. Offering a range of micro-projects allows student choice and voice and provides an element of personalized learning.

The micro-projects described here are designed work with the new CES EduPack Material Science and Engineering database, though they can be used without it. All start at a level that is readily accessible, using the SEARCH function to find information about materials, processes and products, creating charts using the CHART/SELECT function, and extracting relevant data from Records and their linked SCIENCE NOTES. Guidance notes in blue help with any difficult step to ensure that students don’t get stuck. The aim is to capture the student’s interest by posing a striking or contemporary question, provide a step-wise path to a sometimes-unexpected answer, and give the satisfaction of having found it yourself. And learning something about materials at the same time. Each Micro-project has an attached Discussion Point – a challenge to go further – highlighted in blue and separated from the Micro-project by this separator: The Discussion Point poses a question linked to or arising from the first part of the micro-project, so each project has two parts. The first part is the lead-in; its quick, it has clear learning goals and is within the scope of a 1st year undergraduate. Responding to the Discussion point requires independent thought and research, takes longer, but is rewarding if followed. The target level here is 2nd or 3rd year classes. Each Micro-project and its Discussion point has a fully worked Specimen Response, available to the instructor. Fourteen micro-projects are currently available on the Granta Design web-site. More are under development.


Educating Next Generation of Materials Engineers with Global Vision: Experimental Efforts Made in Shanghai

Prof. Shenmin Zhu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P. R. China

In School of Materials Science and Engineering (SMSE) at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, we have made a series of efforts, including the main one of establishing an internationalized education experimental class of MSE in the undergraduate level in 2014. A specialized curriculum has been developed for this class. All MSE subject courses are taught in English. Lecturers for these courses were carefully selected, most of who earned PhD from English-speaking countries. This program has been successfully running for four years, with the first batch of students graduating this year. This talk will share our practice and experience, and discuss our thoughts on the experimental efforts in improving MSE education for next generation of materials engineers.


International Collaborative Cultivation of Top-notch Innovation Talents in Materials Science and Engineering

Prof. Hanxing Liu, Wuhan University of Technology, P. R. China

The discipline of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) is the most important and characteristic discipline of Wuhan University of Technology (WUT). As one of the most important talents cultivation bases and scientific research platforms in the material industry of China, WUT has made great contribution to development of building materials and new materials in the past 60 years. According to the national strategy of innovation-driven development and the urgent demands of higher educational reform, WUT has set up an independent International School of Materials Science and Engineering (ISMSE) two years before. It aims at cultivating top-notch innovation talents with international vision and entrepreneurial leadership in the fields of building materials and advanced materials. To fulfill this great goal, considerable efforts have been devoted to the exploration of an international collaborative cultivation system and the construction of an international education environment. In this presentation, we will show the purpose, idea, measures and achievements of the international collaborative cultivation system in our school and discuss the challenges and concerns we have encountered, as well as possible countermeasures.

Key words: materials science and engineering, international collaborative cultivation, challenges, and concerns


Engineering Principles and Practice (EPP) – Workshop-based Modules

Prof. Daniel Blackwood, National University of Singapore, Singapore

This talk summarizes how student-centered learning approach, through modules Engineering Principles and Practice (EPP) I and II, assists Year 1 students in learning different concepts under NUS Department of Materials Science and Engineering. EPP modules are workshop and laboratory-based modules newly introduced by NUS Faculty of Engineering. The student-centered approach puts students’ interest first, and is more effective in enabling lifelong learning and fostering independent problem solving skills. Students watch recording of briefings online, carry out the hands-on laboratory activities, participate in problem solving discussions, and write and present technical reports. Formative assessment through qualitative feedback timely during the learning process assists students in subsequent learning. Both student feedback and direct assessment from quiz result of phase diagram have shown significant improvement in students’ mastery of the topic, compared to the traditional teacher-centered approach. Students were introduced to additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce three-dimensional models of crystal structures. While creating their blueprints with Autodesk software, students explicitly understand the properties of these crystal structures, including atomic position, lattice spacing, and symmetry. Students also gain insights of the advantages and limitations of AM. In the last part of EPP II, students are required to integrate what they have learnt into solving an engineering problem. Students first need to define the problem based on market need, specify design-limiting parameters, then utilize the CES Edupack to evaluate and choose the suitable materials and manufacturing processes. Cost, environmental considerations, conflict resolutions were also covered. Both CES Edupack and AM benefit the students greatly for design project and final year project in their senior years. Despite the high demand on time and resources, the EPP modules prove to be effective in enhancing students’ learning.


International Aspects of Materials Education

Prof. Anthony Cheetham, University of Cambridge, UK

Science is a global business and young scientists need to be trained so that they can function effectively wherever their future careers may take them. Over the course of my own long and varied career, I have organized a wide range of events that were designed to prepare graduate students and post-docs for international research opportunities. During my 16 years at UC Santa Barbara as Director of the Materials Research Laboratory (1992-2004) and the International Center for Materials Research (2004-2007), we organised many bilateral international workshops in disparate parts of the world, including the Weizmann Institute (1995), Munich (1996), Melbourne (1997), Bangalore (1998), Nantes (1999), Singapore (2000), Lausanne (2001), Mainz (2002), Taejon (2003), Oxford (2004) and Beijing (2005). An important aspect of these workshops was the involvement of young scientists, both as speakers and in poster sessions. In several instances we took graduate students to workshops that were held in developing countries, including India, Argentina, Chile, Zululand, Morocco and Vietnam. These were life-changing experiences for young Americans! Summer and Winter Schools have also provided excellent opportunities for graduate students, and since 2006 I have co-directed an annual Winter School on the Physics and Chemistry of Materials at the JNCASR in Bangalore with Professor C. N. R. Rao. Beyond these larger initiatives, individual graduate students have spent period with collaborators overseas, both in academia and in companies (e.g. Du Pont and Mitsubishi Chemicals). I shall discuss the benefits and challenges of such activities and the possibility of organizing such workshops and schools in Singapore.


Teaching methodology of MSE in UCAS

Prof. Guang-chao Chen, University Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, P. R. China

UCAS is a university built in 1978, originally named as Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, which can be traced back to the first group of graduate students being enrolled in the Chinese Academy of Scineces(CAS)in 1951. She was named as University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2012, and undergraduate students were accepted in 2014. In this talk, we’d like to introduce the students, teachers, and the facilities in College of Material Sciences and Opto-electronic Technology, UCAS. Based on these backgrounds, the educational plan for students will be introduced. It will be involved that educational aim, courses system, practice and graduation.


Multidimensional education of Materials Science and Engineering course

Dr. Liwen Lei, Wuhan University of Technology, P. R. China

Multidimensional education of Materials Science and Engineering course Lilwen Lei Hanxin Liu Jianguo Guan Chengju Fu International schools of Materials Science and Engieering, Wuhan University of Technology, China The characteristic course of Materials Science and Engineering in WUT focuses on the relationship of the three basic elements, such as structure, properties and processing for inorganic non-metallic materials. To meet the educational objectives for the International School of Materials Science and Engineering (ISMSE) in WUT , multidimensional education has been carried out since 2016 to cultivate top-notch innovation talents with international vision. Firstly, the international collative teaching connected with Small Private Online Course (SPOC) was introduced into the course for the broadening the skill. Professor from U.C. Davis will mainly put the emphasis on the structure, properties and their relationships. Secondly, the flipped classroom was implemented with the combination of massive open online courses (MOOC). This will help students get more motivated to analyze and solving materials related science or engineering problems and help them to connect the knowledge with their research work in progress, which will enhance their understanding of this course. Furthermore, let students to make the instructive mind mapping and discuss each other periodically will help them summarize the knowledge.


International Collaborative Cultivation of Top-notch Innovation Talents in MSE

Prof. Jianguo Guan, Wuhan University of Technology, P. R. China

 


Development of undergraduate level computational materials science curriculum at Shanghai Jiao Tong

Prof. Lanting Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P. R. China

It is essential to teach computational materials science at undergraduate levels, not only because it helps students developing necessary skills to understand materials better, but also provides them an opportunity to gain insights for future material developments. Since 2006, we have started a course featuring computational materials at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Our experiences suggest that the practice is worthwhile and successful. Fundamental computational methods are emphasized by focusing on several classical materials problems from which the students may understand the “structure-property” relationship of materials at multiscale. By arranging the course into three modules or categories according to methods characterized by different space and time scales, a link from molecular modeling to finite elements methods can be easily built-up. In the past two years, the materials informatics have been incorporated to keep in pace with Materials Genome Initiative program.


The new design freedom: matter matters

Prof. Lucienne Blessing, Singapore University of Technology and Design

For a long time, materials and manufacturing methods were taken as a given by designers. Materials and related manufacturing methods were selected to produce a shape that could fulfil a product’s requirements. If no suitable material could be found, material scientists would be tasked to design a new material based on a list of desired physical properties and/or behaviors. The role of materials and manufacturing methods in design is changing rapidly. Recent developments in materials and fabrication methods provide designers with an unprecedented freedom to innovate: new, far more intricate shapes, new functional properties, temporal shapes and functions, functional materials, multi-material shapes with user-definable or spatially varying properties, etc.

This freedom affects the links currently considered to exist between function-shape-material-fabrication: the links are no longer “just” relationships that have to be taken into account when designing. They are now links to be exploited. Links that are key to innovation. Examples of developments in materials science and manufacturing will be used to illustrate some of the exciting innovation potential on offer. The examples will show that only a close collaboration in design, research and – not to forget – education is required to exploit and expand the links. The presentation will conclude with some consequences for design research and theory.


Materials and Architecture  

Prof. Bige Tuncer, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 


Design education program in corporation with Ashby method and 1DCAE

Dr. Koichi Ohtomi, Meiji University, Japan

The main task of product development is to develop a good product at lower cost and to bring it to market in a shorter period. Conventional computer-aided design and computer-aided engineering systems are well established in this regard. However, although upstream design is particularly important in product development to add value and incorporate the required functions, it is difficult to apply conventional systems to the upstream design stage due to the lack of design information at that stage. As a solution to this issue, we are developing and educating the product development environment that corporates with the material selection by Ashby method and the 1DCAE proposed by ourselves. Here 1DCAE is defined as the design concepts, methods, and tools that cover the early design stage. We introduce the outline of design education program in corporation with Ashby method and 1DCAE and some case studies.


Transnational Education: The value of equal partnerships

Dr. Gabriel Cavalli, Queen Mary University of London, UK

The recent opening of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) Engineering School (QMES) at Northwestern Polytechnical University (NPU) at Xi’an with 500 students in two programmes in Materials and Polymer Science and Engineering (MPSE) has provided a stimulating setting for transnational education (TNE). QMES follows the flying-faculty model, and it is a “non-legal entity” that operates within NPU, where teaching, administration and research are equally shared. As such, NPU and QMUL perceive each other as equal partners. As a consequence, QMES offers students a truly transnational education experience, combining the strengths of each partner institution, with a serious commitment to student-centred learning (SCL). Underpinning our teaching activity, we have established both a Joint Research Institute for Materials Research, and a joint International Centre for Teaching and Learning to develop innovative Materials Education. Managing the successful coming together of the diverse national, discipline and institutional cultures of QMUL and NPU has required applying acute awareness of each partner’s own patterns of academic approaches and practices. Rather than a challenge to navigate, this has become a source of strength. We will present a reflective analysis on developing excellence in TNE practice, as well as discuss how to best equip yourself for a TNE journey, based on our experience at QMES.


Design-Led Teaching approach and Active Leanings for First Year Undergraduates of Materials Science

Dr. An-Chou Yeh, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan

At the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), National Tsing Hua University (NTHU), Taiwan, the first-year undergraduate course – Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering was taught by the traditional science-lead approach; students started their learning from electronic structure, atomic structure, crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, deformation, phase diagrams, to the introduction of various kinds of materials, processes and properties in order to build up an understanding of the relationship between Structure-Process-Property. However, the interdisciplinary aspect of the materials engineering could not be taught well by this approach and students often got lost among these fundamental sciences without realizing the engineering purpose of the subject. So, design-lead teaching approach has been incorporated in this course; firstly, case studies of various critical components in engineering systems are introduced to highlight various properties requirements for materials, then the choice of materials and processes needed to achieve the state of structure for materials to obtain these properties are described, finally the scientific aspects of the subject can be taught in more details. This design-lead into science-learning approach has been received well by the students, because they are learning the subject with an engineering purpose. The CES EduPack is an excellent tool not only for design-lead teaching in the class, but also a good platform for students to exercise active learnings by performing cyber materials design and selections, as well as eco-friendly product design. In a separate joint course with the Power Mechanical Engineering Department of NTHU, MSE students are encouraged to make their cyber design into reality, through this process, students can learn how to define meaningful functions, constrains, objective, and variables, learn how to select proper materials and processes. Hopefully, this method of teaching can nurture the new generation of engineers to make a better future into reality.


Introduction to Design: SUTD’s freshmore innovative approach

Dr. Arlindo Silva, Singapore University of Technology and Design

This first-year course introduces concepts of design at a variety of scales and design disciplines. Participants are exposed to core technology and design themes including design principles, processes, modes of thinking and analysis, and social and cultural aspects of design. The subject introduces essential skills and mindset of innovation, entrepreneurship, and methodologies in design including teamwork and workflow organization, team building and leadership, written and oral communication, graphic and analytical representation, and fabrication techniques. The course is taught via a weekly one-hour lecture and 3 sessions of cohort classes of 2 hours each. The students are taught in the lectures by the course coordinators, and in the cohort classes they are guided by their course instructors: one from Engineering Product Development and another from Architecture and Sustainable Design. During the cohort classes, students perform individual activities in their design journals and develop their team design projects. Some activities are done as homework. Most of the other activities are about design methods, which the students will then apply to their team projects. The design projects have defined milestones throughout the term, in which the instructors review the work done and grade the milestones submitted by the student teams. Overall, students go through the four phases of design: discover, define, develop and deliver. Building on the team design project, the students complete a 2D project which consists of explicitly showing the links of their projects to the other subjects they are taking concurrently in term 2. In a final exhibition, the students showcase their team design projects via a poster, a prototype and a video.


Educating the Thought Leaders of the Future

Dr. Adrian Lowe, Australian National University, Australia

The world is entering a period of rapid change and development and as educators - it is becoming an increasing challenge to remain relevant within this context. It is widely accepted that the majority of jobs that the next generation will be expected to compete for have not been invented. It therefore stands to reason that tertiary institutions will need to rethink the disciplines it offers to future students. But it is more than that. Universities will also need to look at their approach to teaching and indeed, if the current disciplines are still relevant of if they need to disappear in favour of a new model. Such a model could include hybrid programs where several disciplines synergise under a common ideal to produce more future-focused tertiary experiences. One such ideal is to produce graduates who ‘think like an engineer’. Importantly, you don’t necessarily need to be an engineering graduate in the traditional sense to do this, you just need to be intelligent and able to view challenges in a certain way. In this presentation, I will present several ways in which this ideal can be realised and how it could be optimised through strategic engagement with key stakeholders. There will also be an update on how the ANU is changing its educational modus operandi to best position itself in meeting future challenges and how our College is moving towards producing our nation’s most sought-after and employable young professionals.


Material-focused Design Education Towards Sustainability

Dr. Jeongbin Ok, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

The growing importance of materials in design and manufacturing has spurred design institutions to revise academic programmes and transform curricula, and consequently cross-disciplinary components have been widely employed to educate material literacy. In addition to the changes, aggravating environmental issues represented by climate change and pollution warrant active incorporation of sustainability into design courses. As a response, a model track across three years in undergraduate study that covers 1) empirical exploration of physical properties and emotive qualities of materials; 2) design-led upcycling of waste materials through promotion of aesthetic and functional value; and 3) experimental integration of bio- and bio-based materials with emerging technologies; has been implemented as part of an industrial design programme. While students are encouraged to obtain practical knowledge for their design projects through self-motivated experiments within the programme, scientists and engineers, particularly from government-funded research consortia including New Zealand Material/Product Accelerator and National Science Challenge of which the programme is a member, provide them with theoretical advice and feedback. The integrative yet collaborative approach has produced achievements such as the world’s first plastic recycling robot, handbags made of pulverised inorganic waste, and recycled plastic for decoration that has marble-like texture. Students at postgraduate level pursue research on advanced topics such as ‘artefacts with a preprogrammed lifespan that decompose and disappear upon exposure to specific environmental conditions’ and ‘3D printed cultural products made from ocean plastic waste for island countries without a proper disposal or recycling system’ through partnerships with research institutions, government agencies, environmental businesses and industrial manufacturers.


Sustainability Through Right Material Selection Choice and Well studied Design

Dr. Amit Singh, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, India

Sustainability Through Right Material Selection Choice and Well studied Design Material Selection and Design plays an important role on the impact of product on the environment. A less rigorous and poorly crafted design along-with a poor selection of material can make a product environment disaster. A sustainable product is a product, which gives as little impact on the environment as possible during its life cycle. The LCA is a more comprehensive way of determining the total environmental impact. On the other hand with the increasing gamut of available materials there is a dire need of an educated choice for the selection of right material for a given application. Material selection charts and the Life Cycle Assesment therefore become an imperative tool for Sustainability. Unfortunately, the current awareness among the academia about the availability of such tools is not that encouraging. This talk discusses about various aspects and strategies of Sustainability at the various stages of product life cycle such as- Material selection, Design, Manufacturing and Recycling with a special emphasis on the material selection and design. In addition, various assessment tools for evaluating the impact are also discussed in the paper.


Design Driven Craft Studies

Dr. Jiao Mo, Tongji University, P. R. China

Input traditional crafts study in material education, our teaching is not only focus on the industrialized material but also craft materials and fabrication technics, encourage students experience materials with hands and thoughts. Our students are introduced to traditional crafts as well as modern material and fabrication technics. By inspiring from advantage, then apply their charming findings in modern design with modern manufacture.


Inspiring students with Products, Materials and Processes

Mr. Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK